HealthtoHelp.Com
"Where real knowledge is power"

Your Subtitle text
Massage Therapy
Sit back relax and read below for some helpful information

The body is like a symphony. All parts must be in complete harmony with each other in order for a masterpiece to occur. It’s no wonder that we only achieve ideal health when our body, mind, and spirit find perfect peace and harmony with one another.

Massage therapy has risen above the term “alternative therapy”. Current day, it’s a vital part of the health care practices of many people living in today's stress-heavy world.

Traditional healthcare facilities throughout North America are finally recognizing the important therapeutic benefits that massage therapy lends its patients. Of late, massage therapy has become integral to the health care industry. It’s used to treat every patient imaginable – those with illnesses, chronic diseases, and also average people who are looking to attain a higher sense of well-being, and inner and outer harmony.

Recently, Health Forum released their annual survey, conducted on behalf of the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA). The new national survey polled hospitals and clinics across the nation on their use of massage therapy. The survey revealed that the number of hospitals that now offer massage therapy as a patient service has increased by more than one third over the past two years. This means that American hospitals have recognized the benefits that massage affords patients, and as a result 71 percent are now offering massage therapy for stress management, patient comfort, improved joint and muscle mobility, pregnancy, physical therapy, infant care, as part of their post- and per-operative regimes and to comfort those in hospice facilities

Solid research has proven that massage therapy can:

  • Boost the immune system
  • Significantly lower blood pressure
  • Comfort those going through drug or alcohol withdrawal
  • Sooth chronic joint and muscle pain
  • Battle fatigue
  • Ease stress
  • Combat depression

 

Here are some common Massage Oils that you can use.

These massage oils can be used alone or in combination. .

1. Sweet Almond Oil

Sweet almond oil is one of the most popular massage oils among massage therapists. Extracted from almonds, sweet almond oil is pale yellow in color.

It is slightly oily, which allows hands to glide easily over skin. Sweet almond oil is absorbed fairly quickly, but not so quickly that you need to keep reapplying it.

Compared with other oils, sweet almond oil is reasonably priced. It usually does not irritate skin. People with nut allergies should not use almond oil.

2. Apricot Kernel Oil

Apricot kernel oil is similar in texture and color to almond oil, but costs slightly more. It is rich in vitamin E, a quality that gives it a longer shelf life than the typical oil.

Like almond oil, apricot kernel oil is absorbed into the skin, so it won't leave people feeling greasy afterwards. This property also makes it a good oil to use for
aromatherapy massage.

Apricot kernel oil is a good alternative to sweet almond oil for people with nut allergies.

3. Jojoba Oil

Jojoba is actually a wax extracted from the seed of the jojoba plant. Jojoba is a good option for most people prone to back acne because it is thought to have antibacterial properties and contains long chain wax esters that closely resembles skin sebum.

Jojoba has a very long shelf life, so it's a good choice if you don't use it regularly.

It is very well-absorbed, which makes it a favorite carrier oil for aromatherapy. Jojoba is usually not irritating to skin.

One drawback: jojoba oil is so silky and quickly absorbed, you may need to reapply it often or mix it with other oils listed here. It is more pricey than sweet almond oil.

4. Fractionated Coconut Oil

Although you may think of coconut oil as being a thick, white solid oil, fractionated coconut oil is actually a light, non-greasy, liquid oil.

It is called fractionated coconut oil because it contains only a fraction of the whole oil. The long-chain triglycerides have been removed, leaving only the medium-chain triglycerides.

Fractionated coconut oil is less pricey than many other oils (it's comparable to sweet almond oil) and like jojoba oil, has a very long shelf life. But perhaps the top feature of fractionated coconut oil is that it tends not to stain sheets, a problem with most massage oils.

5. Sunflower Oil

Sunflower oil is a light, non-greasy oil that won't leave skin feeling oily. The oil, extracted from sunflower seeds, is rich in the essential fatty acid linoleic acid, as well as palmitic acid and stearic acid, all components of healthy skin. The amount of linoleic acid in skin declines with age and can be stripped by harsh soaps and cleansers.

Sunflower oil can go rancid quickly, so it should be purchased in small quantities and stored in a dark cool area. Squeezing one or two capsules of pure vitamin E oil into the bottle may help to extend the shelf life.

People with allergies to the sunflower plant family should avoid sunflower oil.

Other Massage Oils

  • Avocado Oil
    Avocado oil is pressed from the avocado fruit. Deep green in color, avocado oil is a heavier oil and is usually mixed with lighter massage oils such as sweet almond oil.

    Avocado oil is roughly double the cost of sweet almond oil. People who are sensitive to latex may be sensitive to avocado oil.

  • Cocoa Butter
    Cocoa butter is very rich and has a distinct chocolate aroma. It is solid at room temperature and has a heavy texture, so it needs to be blended with other oils or used only for very small areas.

  • Grapeseed Oil
    In many respects, grapeseed oil makes a great massage oil. It has little-to-no odor, and it has a smooth, silky texture without being greasy.

    However, most grapeseed oil is extracted from grape seeds using a solvent (rather than being pressed from the seeds), which some aromatherapists say make it an inferior oil for aromatherapy massage.

  • Kukui Nut Oil
    A light, thin, non-greasy oil. Native to a Hawaii, kukui nut oil is typically used on all skin types, including oily skin and sun-damaged skin.

  • Olive Oil
    Most people are familiar with olive oil as a cooking oil, but it is occasionally used for massage. It is a heavy oil with a greasy or sticky texture and recognizable aroma that many associate with cooking, so it's usually not used on its own for massage.

    One study compared topical olive oil with sunflower oil and found that olive oil had no effect on epidermal barrier function, whereas topical sunflower oil resulted in significant improvement in the skin barrier.

  • Sesame Oil
    Sesame oil is prized in Ayurveda, the traditional medicine of India. It is used in a daily Ayurvedic self-massage called abhyanga, as well as
    shirodhara.

    According to Ayurveda, sesame oil is especially useful for nourishing and detoxifying and for ailments associated with the vata type, such as anxiety, poor circulation, constipation, bloating, and excessive dryness.

    Sesame oil is a rather thick oil that may leave skin feeling oily, so it can be blended with lighter massage oils. The unrefined oil has a strong aroma.

  • Shea Butter
    Extracted from the seeds of a tree native to Africa, shea butter is a solid at room temperature. Like cocoa butter, shea butter is heavy and can leave an oily feeling on skin, so it is usually not used on its own for massage. It may be blended or used for very small areas.

    Shea contains a natural latex, so people with latex allergies should do a patch test before using it.

  • Wheat Germ Oil
    Wheat germ oil is too thick to use on its own as a massage oil, but it can be blended with lighter oils. Wheat germ oil is rich in vitamin E.

Below are some massage techniques that you can try!!!

Acupressure

Dating back 5000 years, acupressure is part of traditional Chinese medicine and is often described as "acupuncture without the needles." As a non-intrusive precursor of acupuncture, acupressure uses deep finger pressure applied at certain points located along an invisible system of energy channels within the body called meridians. Because these points directly relate to organs and glands of the body, constrictions in the flow of energy at these points causes disease and discomfort. Acupressure stimulates these points to remove blockages, to increase the energy flow, to reduce stress, and to promote health and harmony in the body. Rated Medium

Alexander Technique

The Alexander Technique is an awareness practice for identifying and developing discipline over the negative physical habits of incorrect posture and movement. Developed a century ago by actor F. Matthias Alexander, who used it to cure himself of chronic laryngitis, he believed if the vertebrae were out of alignment it was due to these poor habits. The Alexander Technique is a simple method of reeducating the mind and body to improve ease and freedom of movement, balance, and coordination. The technique teaches the use of the appropriate amount of effort for a particular activity, giving you more energy for all your activities.

Amma Therapy

In Chinese, amma means "push-pull." Amma therapy is concerned with removing blockages and balancing the body's flow of energy along its meridians with a combination of many therapeutic massage techniques including shiatsu, reflexology, deep fascial and connective tissue massage, Swedish massage, and skeletal manipulations. Originated in China, interest in Amma Therapy has been regenerated by Korean-born Tina Sohn.

Aromatherapy

Aromatherapy is the use of essential oils for curative and rejuvenating effects. Dating back to ancient Egypt, India, and the Far East, this simple therapy has been used for centuries to reduce stress and tension, refresh and invigorate the body, soothe emotions, and clear the mind. After an initial discussion with the client, specific essential oils are used in conjunction with other appropriate techniques, such as massage, acupressure, or reflexology. Used in oils, the essential oil is absorbed through the skin and into the body to affect physiological change. When inhaled the aroma directly affects the limbic area of the brain that is related to emotions and memories.

Deep Tissue Massage

Deep Tissue Massage is designed to reach the deep portions of thick muscles, specifically the individual muscle fibers. Using deep muscle compression and friction along the grain of the muscle, its purpose is to unstick the fibers of the muscles and release both toxins and deeply held patterns of tension. Rated Deep.

 

Web Hosting Companies